News & Events

  • This webinar, hosted by USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism with support from NIHCM Foundation, will look at groundbreaking new research on what private insurance plans are paying for common procedures in markets across the country and how those prices are influenced by provider consolidation.

  • Living in poverty can have serious health consequences. Lower-income Americans are at higher risk of developing chronic diseases, and providers report challenges ensuring compliance with treatment guidelines when their patients have limited resources.

  • Americans spend more than $30 billion a year on vitamins and supplements. But how do we know these pills are safe? In Supplements and Safety, FRONTLINE, The New York Times and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation team up to investigate the supplement industry...

  • To recognize the critical role of researchers and journalists in improving the health care system, each year NIHCM Foundation presents awards for outstanding work in these fields. We are pleased to announce a call for entries for our 22nd annual awards program.

  • The New York Times has a front-page story today highlighting new research about variations in health spending. This research, led by Yale University's Zack Cooper and supported by grants from NIHCM Foundation and The Commonwealth Fund, marks a major advance in the understanding of prices and spending in private insurance.

  • NIHCM Foundation hosted a webinar on strategies to improve adolescent health and reduce teen pregnancy...

NIHCM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Washington, DC – August 1, 2012 – Between 2000 and 2010, the number of children living in poverty increased by nearly 30 percent to 15.7 million, with 1.6 million children facing homelessness. 

Given the fundamental relationship between living environment and health, the surge in child poverty and homelessness present a significant imperative for the health care system. Homeless children, for example, are sick four times as often as other kids, and one-third will develop at least one major mental disorder by the age of eight. To discuss the role of health plans and health plan foundations in fostering stable housing for families, NIHCM Foundation hosted a webinar on July 26, 2012 that included the following presentations: 

  • Natalie Coupe from The National Center on Family Homelessness highlighted the dire trends in family homelessness, which has increased 38 percent since 2007, and the traumatic impact of housing instability on children’s health.
  • Jocelyn Ancheta from the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota Foundation described several of the foundation’s efforts to cultivate healthy living environments, including the green rehabilitation of low-income housing units.
  • Patrick O’Sullivan from the Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas showed how health plan foundations are reaching the homeless population by integrating health services and education into homeless shelter programming.
  • Barbara DiPietro from the National Health Care for the Homeless Council discussed the impact of the Affordable Care Act, including increased use of community health workers and new models of care coordination, as well as the outreach and enrollment challenges that still remain.
  • Jennifer Ho from the US Interagency Council on Homelessness explained the council’s strategic plan to end homelessness by 2020, and stressed that this issue requires close collaboration between the health, education and housing sectors.

Please visit our website to view an audio-video archive of the event and to download copies of the presentation slides.

About NIHCM

NIHCM Foundation is a nonprofit, nonpartisan group that conducts research on health care issues. The Foundation disseminates research findings and analyses that promote and enhance access to health care and the efficiency and effectiveness of health care services and delivery.

Contact:

Nancy Chockley
President and CEO
NIHCM Foundation
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202-296-4426

 
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