News & Events

  • Most children’s health system experience is limited to the pediatrician’s office, but those with chronic or complex medical needs often deal with care that is fragmented, duplicative and crisis-driven. This leads to stress on families and wasteful utilization.

  • Just 5 percent of the population accounts for 50 percent of national health spending. Behind these numbers are patients and families struggling with multiple chronic conditions, physical and mental impairments, and tremendous stress.

  • Washington, DC – October 10, 2014 – NIHCM Foundation has awarded $215,000 to eight organizations through the first cycle of its new journalism grant program announced earlier this year.

  • The Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC)—a small panel of medical professionals whose recommendations have considerable influence over Medicare payment levels for their own services—has drawn quite of bit of political and media scrutiny recently.

  • More than 8 percent of two- to five-year-olds are obese, and another 23 percent are overweight and at substantial risk of becoming obese by the eighth grade. These early years are a critical time to focus on the development of healthy habits.

  • The annual cost of cancer care in the U.S. is large and growing—projected to hit $184 billion by 2020. This fiscal reality has spurred interest in bundled-payment models that reward providers for maintaining or improving clinical outcomes while controlling costs.

NIHCM

NIHCM Foundation is pleased to announce the release of a new data brief, "The Concentration of Health Care Spending." Spending for health care in the U.S. is highly concentrated among a small subset of Americans. Just 5 percent of the population accounted for nearly half of all health care spending in 2009.

Understanding these high-spenders is vital for developing strategies to reduce overall spending growth. In this data brief you will learn more about:

  • the characteristics and health conditions of the highest spenders,
  • the persistence of high spending patterns over time,
  • the challenges in targeting the most expensive cases for better care management, and
  • the implications of concentrated spending for risk-based payment and insurance market reforms.

This brief is the third in a series of data briefs on health care spending.

 
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